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Nothing Phone (1) won’t launch in USA and Canada

Nothing has confirmed that it won’t be releasing its upcoming Phone (1) in the US and Canada. The issue was first brought to light by leaker Evan Blass who spotted that Nothing had a list of supported wireless carriers that didn’t include any North American carriers. 

Instead, a small number of devices will be distributed to community investors as part of a closed beta, said the company in a statement to PCMag. Nothing further added that while you can try and use the phone in the US, it’ll have “unpredictable” coverage on T-Mobile, no voice-over-LTE on AT&T, and Verizon won’t give any service. 

The company does have plans to launch a US-supported phone in the future, as evident by the closed beta program. Additionally, Nothing’s partnership with StockX will also allow US customers to buy a Nothing phone. Using it, however, is an entirely different scenario. 

Rumours that the phone won’t launch in the US first showed up during StockX’s listing, which came with a disclaimer stating that the phone is not fully supported in North America. That functionality may be impacted according to the carrier. 

The phone is due to launch during Nothing’s keynote even on July 12. The rumour is it’ll launch with either the Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 or Snapdragon 7 Gen 1 paired with at least 8GB RAM and 128GB storage.

A 4500mAh battery powers everything, and we’re expecting Phone (1) to come with a triple camera setup, a 50MP primary shooter (with OIS support), an 8MP ultrawide and a 2MP depth sensor. The front camera is a 32MP punch-hole placed in the top centre of the display. 

At the moment however it seems like either Nothing couldn’t strike a deal to get US carriers to support the phone or didn’t have enough to make it through the rather costly approval processes. Breaking into the US Smartphone market has been historically difficult for startups as selections from US carriers are usually dominated by Apple or Samsung. 

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