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OpenAI is launching AI-powered search on Monday to rival Google

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Photo: Koshiro K / Shutterstock.com

OpenAI will launch its AI-driven search engine on Monday. It is expected to rival Google’s position in the search market and represent a shift away from traditional search engine models.

On May 8, it was reported that OpenAI is actively working on a feature enabling ChatGPT to conduct searches. Reports indicate that the AI-powered search engine will leverage ChatGPT’s capabilities, allowing users to pose questions and receive comprehensive answers from diverse online content, including news articles, blogs, Wikipedia entries, and more.

Furthermore, images could be included to enhance and personalise user experience.

While OpenAI has yet to officially confirm the date, Reuters reports that the unveiling will be strategically timed just ahead of Google’s annual developer conference, Google I/O 2024, scheduled for Tuesday, May 14.

Signs of OpenAI’s impending launch have already emerged, with search.chatgpt.com showing recent activity, hinting at the platform’s readiness. While current search functionalities are limited to paying ChatGPT users, the imminent release of OpenAI’s search engine is expected to democratise access to advanced AI-driven search capabilities.

Google Search is still the primary search engine. It will be interesting to see how OpenAI’s new tool fares against it.

In response, Google has ramped up efforts to enhance its AI models and chatbot systems, including Gemini AI models and the Search Generative Experience (SGE). Recent developments within Google, such as appointing a new ‘Head of Search’ and exploring SGE expansions, underscore the company’s new direction.

Additionally, Google’s consideration of making SGE a paid product reflects the company’s ongoing strategies to monetise advanced AI-driven features.

Recently, OpenAI partnered with Stack Overflow and Financial Times to harness their content. Also, the company is being sued by eight newspapers in the United States for copyright infringement.

In February, OpenAI teased its Sora model, which can generate up to minute-long videos via text prompts.

The impending clash between OpenAI and Google in the search engine arena can usher in a new era of competition and innovation in AI-powred search technologies and can dent Google’s might.

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Kumar Hemant

Kumar Hemant

Deputy Editor at Candid.Technology. Hemant writes at the intersection of tech and culture and has a keen interest in science, social issues and international relations. You can contact him here: kumarhemant@pm.me

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